If you only get one minor traffic ticket every few years, you may be right. It isn’t a big deal. However, if you are one of the unlucky drivers who feels as though every patrol car has a spotlight on your vehicle, those citations could add up to big trouble for you.

Why? Because many traffic violations end up adding points to your license. If you accumulate 12 points within a two-year period, you could find yourself without a driver’s license for a while. That would more than likely be a big deal.

Those pesky speeding ticket points

Just about everyone has driven above the posted speed limit at one time or another. If you are the unlucky one who gets a ticket for it, you could face the following point penalties:

  • If you receive a ticket for going six to 29 mph over a speed limit of less than 55 mph, you receive two points on your license.
  • If you receive a ticket for going 11 to 29 mph over the speed limit of 55 mph or above, you receive two points on your license.
  • If you drive 30 mph over any posted speed limit, the state assesses four points to your license.
  • If your ticket is below the minimums set above, no points go on your license.

If you happen to have a “lead foot,” you could quickly end up with the maximum amount of points within two years.

Traffic violations worth two points

Other than for speeding, you could also incur two points on your license for violating an Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles restriction. You could also incur two points for all other moving violations not already assessed a certain amount of points, speeding or exceeding vehicle size limitations.

Traffic violations worth four points

You may receive four points on your license if authorities accuse you of wantonly or willfully disregarding other people or their property’s safety.

Traffic violations worth six points

Your license may receive six points if a court convicts you of street racing, committing a motor vehicle felony or using a motor vehicle in the commission of a felony. You may also find six points added to your license if a court convicts you of evading police, homicide by vehicle or operating a vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Finally, operating a vehicle without the owner’s consent, without a valid license and failing to remain at the scene of an accident could mean an assessment of six points.

What happens when the points start adding up

Once you reach six points within two years, the BMV sends you a letter warning you that you could lose your license for at least six months, take a remedial driving course after the suspension ends and provide proof of financial responsibility to the BMV for three to five years.

Letting traffic tickets pile up has some potentially harsh penalties. In order to help ensure that you don’t reach a point where your license could end up suspended, you may want to challenge each traffic violation since it may be possible to avoid these point assessments. Even if you don’t reach 12 points within two years, the accumulation of any points could jeopardize your employment if driving makes up all or a portion of your work duties.