With many people working from home and schools not in session, there are fewer drivers on Ohio roads right now. With less congestion and fewer vehicles sharing the road, the drivers who are commuting or driving for essential tasks, such as grocery shopping, are perhaps more likely to speed. It Is not clear whether these increased speeds have led to an increase in speeding tickets.

Open roads and less traffic is proving to be a temptation that many cannot resist. While it’s fairly common for some drivers to travel a few hours over the posed speed limits, studies are finding that drivers are more likely to travel at hazardous speeds. Regardless of what other issues are affecting travel and the number of people on the road, violating the speed limit can still result in expensive fines and other penalties.

When comparing speeding along specific stretches of road and in certain Ohio cities in 2019 and now in 2020, studies note that the rate has actually tripled. This is with fewer drivers currently on the road. Data comparison also indicates that speeding in 2019 was likely to be a few miles an hour above the speed limit, but in 2020, drivers are prone to go dangerously high over the speed limit.

Law enforcement will continue to monitor speeding during this time. Speeding tickets can result in fines, but also penalties such as higher insurance rates. Paying the fine is an admission of guilt, and it’s not always the best course of action. With the right help, it may be possible to fight a ticket and keep a driving record clean.