Over the last six months, there has been a sharp decrease in the number of drivers on Ohio roads. Fewer drivers has led to lower numbers of car accidents, but it has also led to an increased likelihood of speeding. When roads are not as crowded, drivers may be more prone to drive over the speed limit. Empty roads actually lead to more speeding tickets.

People are not just driving too fast; they are actually driving at very high speeds. Since April of this year, Ohio law enforcement has written 2,200 tickets for individuals going at least 100 mph. The highest speed recorded was 147 mph. Statistics indicate the overall amount of traffic is down around 15%, but those driving 80 mph or higher has increased around 30%.

One thing noted by law enforcement is that that the number of people speeding has not decreased, even as the state reopens and more people are on the road. In July, there were 154 fatalities on Ohio roads, representing the state’s worst month for traffic fatalities since 2007. Drivers who speed may end up with costly tickets.

A speeding ticket may not seem like a big deal, but it can be. The fines are only part of the financial loss one may experience. A ticket can also lead to higher insurance rates and points on a driver’s license. It is especially serious for individuals who drive for a living. Anyone who simply pays a ticket is actually admitting guilt. There are times when it is worthwhile to fight a ticket in order to mitigate potential consequences.